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What is it?

The process of re-developing or adapting content from one culture to another, while transferring its meaning and maintaining its intent, style, and voice.

Why is it important?

In transcreation, the concepts, feelings, and call to action that are expressed in the source are maintained in the target, but the emphasis, design, and the text are oriented specifically to the target culture. While there are some grey areas, transcreation goes much deeper than localization typically does and, consequently, incurs significantly higher costs.

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What is it?

The concurrent distribution of all content related to a particular product or service to all target markets in the appropriate languages. Also known as Simultaneous Shipment.

Why is it important?

Releasing a product in all markets at the same time helps ensure successful product introductions, stronger sales, and greater customer satisfaction[Asnes 2010].

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What is it?

The market segment that a company considers to be the most important to their objectives and, therefore, their main focus.

Why is it important?

Companies segment their markets to help them devise the most effective go-to-market strategy for each segment. Content and localization strategies will be different for primary, secondary, and tertiary markets.

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What is it?

A systematic method used to perform qualitative research aimed at understanding cultures, groups, and organizations.

Why is it important?

Ethnography has evolved, spanning across several anthropology specialties, and ethnographers have joined forces with communication science and market research practitioners. The discipline has moved away from rigorous academia toward a more pragmatic and fast-paced approach. Some large corporations use ethnographers for market research, but the potential of ethnography is still largely overlooked[Ladner 2012].

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What is it?

The parts of written or spoken text surrounding a piece of content that clarify the meaning, and which are particularly important when multiple meanings could be attributed to that content.

Why is it important?

When multiple meanings are possible, translators need background and reference information so they can choose the right word. Having context available is crucial for localizers to provide a top-notch translation.

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What is it?

The practice of proactively maintaining dictionaries and glossaries to improve consistency within an organization. Terms are organized and controlled based on accepted standards, with a clear set of guidelines dictating their use within local contexts.

Why is it important?

Terminology management enables correct and consistent use of terms throughout the writing or translation process, or any other effort requiring accurate vocabulary usage.

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What is it?

The analysis of a given text or corpus, with the goal of identifying relevant term candidates within their context. Also called term mining or term harvesting.

Why is it important?

Term extraction is the starting point of all terminology management tasks. Term extraction is usually followed by the elimination of inconsistencies. Well-managed terminology improves quality, reduces costs, and improves time to market.

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What is it?

Alphabetical list of terms and definitions that is used consistently by all stakeholders of a specific project or product, including localization.

Why is it important?

Glossaries support localization efforts by eliminating ambiguity in how terms are used in specific contexts, which, in turn, improves communication and translation. Glossaries intended for internal use or by the localization vendor tend to be more detailed than those intended for customers.

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What is it?

A curated set of vocabulary selected to communicate clearly and simply for a specific purpose. Controlled language is often used when writing for machine translation or for global audiences.

Why is it important?

Controlled language is a critical feature of writing for localization. It is an umbrella term that encompasses several initiatives, including Plain Language, Simplified Technical English, and Caterpillar Fundamental English, among others. Effective controlled language initiatives choose the simplest terms needed to convey meaning, while also restricting grammar, syntax, and verb forms.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Controlled Language"